Appropriate Cold Weather Dress

As we head further into winter and slowly inch into colder weather let me break down a few things. To be honest here, it saddens me that I have to spell any of this out, but since I haven’t figured out how to bottle common sense and sell it I’ll break it down.

Dress in layers for starters. Indoors or outdoors you should dress in layers. That way as the temperature fluctuates throughout the day you can remove or add to help regulate body temperature and keep yourself at a comfortably warm temperature and also keep yourself from any unnecessary sweating. One of the quickest ways to become cold is to have moisture of any kind on your skin or soaked into your clothing and sweating will do just that. Here’s a clutch tip from scouting. Always have an extra pair socks at hand.

Speaking of socks, can someone explain to me socks with crocs or sandals? If you are one of those people that thinks this is an ok fashion choice I hope you roll an ankle. (Side note: if you allow your signification other to walk out in public dressed as such it’s time to re-evaluate the relationship.) As for that being your excuse that allows you to wear them in colder weather that makes you an even bigger idiot. Please don’t send me links showing these new “outdoor socks” either. They are garbage and as I stated before. Moisture will be your undoing.

Let me pontificate on one more point. Ladies, if you are going to wear a skirt in cold weather so be it. Your dress choice is your own, but I beg of you some common sense please. Get the thick thermal tights. Helps retain body heat better. Props to my wife on that one. (Honestly hate hearing about how cold someone is and then realizing underdressed they are. I have no sympathy for self inflected problems.) secondly if you opt for the mini/micro skirt there’s no a pair of thermal tights that are going to help you but me thinks that if that was go to choice I doubt tights of any kind were a thought.

I could go on about other proper cold weather attire for hours but since I have better thoughts to get down I’ll stop here. These are just some general thoughts I have and the two most egresses problems I have noticed since the temperatures have started dropping.

Balancing Your Checkbook

Keeping your checkbook balanced is very important. A skill few people know how to do correctly or at all for that matter. (To be honest I couldn’t even tell you where my check register is. Just check my online account every couple of days against what I purchased to make sure everything is kosher.) However, doing so at the register is not the place to do it. Take your receipt place it in your check book and deal with it later. Do it in your vehicle if it something that will bother you that much or better yet wait until you are in the comfort of your own home and can file away receipts in a timely manner.

If you are the only person at the register I honestly don’t care, but when there is someone waiting or multiple people for that matter common courtesy dictates you get the hell out of the way. Whomever is running the register is most likely not going to ask you to move. (No one wants the negative customer service review.) It is just easier to let the person(s) behind them shame them into moving.

This all ties into a couple of things I have mentioned in the past. First, the post about keeping your head on a swivel. Using checks is a time consuming process. Wherever you are using them is most likely going to be busy so get it together and get out of other customers way and stop tying up the person running the register. They most likely have three other tasks running through their head that they know need to be completed yet have to wait for you to hammer out a check.

Secondly, I have pontificated about how checks are an archaic form of payment. There are just way to many other payment methods that exist in which your bill can be settled up with. Most of which are safer and easier.

 

 

 

Why Didn’t You Remind Me?

One of the things that continues to baffle me is why patients think we should remind them that they are due to get their medication(s) refilled. Does the gas station call you to tell you to refill your gas tank? Does your grocery store remind you to get more food for your refrigerator? The answer to both is no. So why some patients place the responsibility to know when to refill your medication on the pharmacy is completely beyond me.

At least once a week I have someone say to me, “I’ve been out of my medication for three days. Why didn’t you guys call me?”. Seriously, if you are relying on the pharmacy to remind you to pick up medication that is most likely life sustaining you are in for a rough ride. There are a litany of things I would love to say to the patients at that point, but since I have to answer to “the man” at the end of the day I apologize to the patient and tell them to give me a few minutes so that I can fill their medication they so dearly need now.

Several innovations have been created so as to help mitigate this problem. Automated refills. Phone call reminders both automated and personal that a medication is due to be filled and/or that it is ready and to come pick it up. E-mail reminders. There’s also an app with an alert function. If we could send carrier pigeons we would. Yet despite all that, we will still get people coming in wondering why we didn’t call them to fill their medication.

 

Keep Your Head on a Swivel

Every year I see a greater percentage of people walking around like a zombie while staring at their cell phones. I’m convinced that in addition to putting on your clothes daily that some people will have to wear a censor harness so that their phone can alert them to when they are going to walk into something or they are about to get hit by a car. Let me describe what I observed the other day while out shopping with my wife.

While running back out to my truck because I forgot the coupons I got blocked by a mother and daughter leaving the store. (Both were on their phones.) While they wandered to the exit I was finally able to maneuver around them, but then I noticed what part of the exit they were head towards. The store we were in had both a set of push doors and a set of automatic opening doors.

If you haven’t guessed it they were heading towards the push doors. The daughter slowed down in time to realize her error, but because she never picked her face up from her phone, she walked straight into the security sensor that sits next to the exit. This then alerted the mother so she avoided walking into the door. Needless to say I had a good chuckle at their expense.

My point being is that everyone needs to be aware of their surroundings. There is nothing that important on your phone that it should facilitate you walking into a door or something worse. Catching that Charizard or texting your BFF can wait.

What’s the Number for 911?

The advent of 911 for calling emergency services has to be one of the best tools created for the general public. Significantly more efficient than having to remember a 10 digit number in order to call for help and that’s assuming you have the ability and/or time to dial all ten digits.

I am writing about 911 because in the past year or so a private ambulance company charted by the local hospital chain has started advertising pretty heavily in our area. Which is fine by me, but the problem lies in the fact that part of their advertisement encourages people to not call 911 but to call their number instead. There is a litany of problems with this, but I’ll try and curtail it to a couple of key ones.

911 operations centers have multiple operators available around the clock even on holidays and if the local 911 center is overwhelmed for some reason the neighboring one can normally pick up some of the overload. As for the private ambulance company I don’t know if it’s just going to one person or multiple people. It is also unknown as to what their “call centers” hours/days of operation are.

911 also has a priority system built based on geographic location and time of day and day of week. (Not all towns have round the clock paid duty crews in my area.) This is so that if the 1st due for an area is out of service because they are already responding to a call, unable to fully crew their ambulance, or might be having their rescue vehicle serviced the next best option can be sent to the call for help.

Now I’m sure the ambulance company has some sort of priority system in place where they do know who is or isn’t responding to a request for services and which vehicles are crewed and operational and which aren’t, but what happens if a call comes in and there aren’t any available units. Is the person told they’ll have to wait? I know they aren’t going to be calling a competitor and asking for backup and I also doubt they’ll be calling 911 for said person either.

Please understand that I am not involved in FIRE/EMS services in any way, but I also know how to use common sense. I have talked with friends that are part of ambulance companies and have done some of my own personal research. I know the private ambulance company is trying to drum up business, but they are going about it the wrong way. There is an established and mostly efficient system in place in which people can call and get emergency help. Although I can appreciate competition, creating a separate entity along side 911 is not the way to break into the market.

There are lots of private ambulance and fire companies for that offered their services to other 911 response centers and started as backups in the priority chains and moved their up to first call. That makes sense to. Again, I get it, they are a business and trying to survive, but you don’t get to use a business tactic that could cost someone their life.

Know Your Place

I must have half written this post six or seven times over the last week or so in attempt to convey my view point and not sound like a total jackass. At this point coupled with my inability to sleep I’m just going to let the thoughts flow and hope the makes some sense and aren’t just the incoherent ramblings of a mad man.

Knowing your place in the hierarchy of a work places structure is critical. It means that you understand your position in its entirety and can essentially function autonomously. If your supervisor hasn’t conveyed it to you I’m telling you now that your hard work is greatly appreciated. They don’t have to constantly “supervise” you and can focus energies where needed.

This kind of work ethic does not go unnoticed. It will result in praise, raises, and promotions. Which brings me closer to point I’m trying to make. When you are eventually elevated to a higher level position or a different department it doesn’t mean forget what you have learned to this point. You should also expect to have to step back down in the trenches and do those old tasks again no matter what the reason. Those said previous tasks do not become beneath you. Remember that you did them for some amount of time to get where you are.

To paraphrase what Mel Gibson’s character (Lt. Col. Hal Moore) said in, We Were Soldiers, “You will master your job. You will then teach it to the man above and below you.” I’m not sure how this exactly ties into everything here, but I liked those lines a lot. Everyone must work together as one. Capable of covering the position of the person above and below in case of a man down situation.  This is applicable in any work environment showing that you have mastered your own position and are flexible to do other tasks and have already learned some if not all of the needed skills in order to move up into the next position.

 

 

Unsolicited Opinion

I’m going to assume that if you are here reading these words that you hold my opinion in some regard or at the minimum are curious and want to see what I have to say. Either way, thank you for taking a few minutes out of your day to read my words of wisdom/ hair brained ranting’s. With that being said here’s my story.

The other day I was at Lowes with my wife looking at refrigerators. The kitchen of the house we are buying has a color pallet that stainless steel looks great in so of course that’s what I am looking at. All of a sudden a wild Gengar appears out of no where and a Poke battle ensues……at least that’s what the ambush felt like.

As I was standing there reading the specs on the refrigerator a random stranger wanders up next to me and asks if I am looking to buy stainless steel. I inform said stranger that I am because that’s what we designed our kitchen for. Said stranger then proceeds to go into a five minute diatribe about why I shouldn’t buy stainless steel products. Upon completion of his speech I thanked the stranger for his input and went on about my business. Why this person felt compelled to sway my purchasing opinion ill never know.

At first I thought it was a Lowes team member or one of the vendors trying to sway me towards a different product, but said person didn’t have a badge or clothing that would indicate as such. From what I gathered he wasn’t a contractor either. I was just left dumb founded that some random stranger whom I can’t even grab at the foggiest memory of past random patient interaction felt compelled to “inform” me as to why I shouldn’t buy stainless steel.

After sharing the this story with a co-worker I equated my interaction with the above mentioned stranger to the Kool-aid man busting through the wall while at a doctors appointment and telling me I shouldn’t take blood pressure medication after I just finished talking with the doctor about why I should.